Dodgers, MLB honor Jackie Robinson's centennial year

Mon Apr 15 10:28pm ET
By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

Baltimore Orioles' Miguel Castro, center, and Jesus Sucre, left, celebrate with teammates after defeating the Boston Red Sox during a baseball game in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2019. The players are all wearing (42) in honor of Jackie Robinson Day.(AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)


Miami Marlins left fielder Curtis Granderson wears commemorative shoes for Jackie Robinson Day at Marlins Park before a baseball game against the Chicago Cubs, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Miami. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)


Miami Marlins' Starlin Castro runs past a commemorative third base bearing No. 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day during the first inning of a baseball game against the Chicago Cubs, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Miami. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)


Chicago Bears player Eddie Jackson, left, and Chicago White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson, right, shake hands before Jackson threw out a ceremonial first pitch before a baseball game between the White Sox and the Kansas City Royals, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Chicago. No. 42 was worn to honor Jackie Robinson. (AP Photo/Matt Marton)


Milwaukee Brewers' Eric Thames stands for the national anthem on Jackie Robinson Day during a baseball game against the St. Louis Cardinals, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)


LOS ANGELES (AP) Vin Scully joined the widow of his friend Jackie Robinson to honor the player who broke baseball's color barrier during Robinson's centennial birthday celebration.

Scully was a surprise attendee for pre-game ceremonies at Dodger Stadium on Monday night.

Robinson's 96-year-old widow, Rachel, was joined by the couple's daughter, Sharon, and son, David, on the field.

Robinson became the first black player in Major League Baseball with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947. Scully began calling the team's games three years later, and the now-retired Hall of Fame announcer was friendly off the field with the man he called ''Jack.''

Robinson, who died at age 53 in 1972, would have turned 100 on Jan. 31.

His No. 42 was worn by every major leaguer Monday. The number was retired around the major leagues in 1997.

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